Learning Resources
 

List Basics


HTML offers authors several mechanisms for specifying lists of information. All lists must contain one or more list elements. Lists may contain:

  •     Unordered information.
  •     Ordered information.
  •     Definitions.


The previous list, for example, is an unordered list, created with the UL element:


  • Unordered information.
  • Ordered information.
  • Definitions.


An ordered list, created using the OL element, should contain information where order should be emphasized, as in a recipe:
 

  1. Mix dry ingredients thoroughly.
  2. Pour in wet ingredients.
  3. Mix for 10 minutes.
  4. Bake for one hour at 300 degrees.

Definition lists, created using the DL element, generally consist of a series of term/definition pairs (although definition lists may have other applications). Thus, when advertising a product, one might use a definition list:

Lower cost
The new version of this product costs significantly less than the previous one!
Easier to use
We've changed the product so that it's much easier to use!
Safe for kids
You can leave your kids alone in a room with this product and they won't get hurt (not a guarantee).

defined in HTML as:

Lower cost
The new version of this product costs significantly less than the previous one!
Easier to use
We've changed the product so that it's much easier to use!
Safe for kids
You can leave your kids alone in a room with this product and they won't get hurt (not a guarantee).

Lists may also be nested and different list types may be used together, as in the following example, which is a definition list that contains an unordered list (the ingredients) and an ordered list (the procedure):

The ingredients:
  • 100 g. flour
  • 10 g. sugar
  • 1 cup water
  • 2 eggs
  • salt, pepper
The procedure:
  1. Mix dry ingredients thoroughly.
  2. Pour in wet ingredients.
  3. Mix for 10 minutes.
  4. Bake for one hour at 300 degrees.