Risk Mitigation
 


Risk management is the identification, assessment, and prioritization of risks (defined in ISO 31000 as the effect of uncertainty on objectives, whether positive or negative) followed by coordinated and economical application of resources to minimize, monitor, and control the probability and/or impact of unfortunate events[1] or to maximize the realization of opportunities. Risks can come from uncertainty in financial markets, project failures (at any phase in design, development, production, or sustainment life-cycles), legal liabilities, credit risk, accidents, natural causes and disasters as well as deliberate attack from an adversary, or events of uncertain or unpredictable root-cause. Several risk management standards have been developed including the Project Management Institute, the National Institute of Standards and Technology, actuarial societies, and ISO standards.[2][3] Methods, definitions and goals vary widely according to whether the risk management method is in the context of project management, security, engineering, industrial processes, financial portfolios, actuarial assessments, or public health and safety.

The strategies to manage risk typically include transferring the risk to another party, avoiding the risk, reducing the negative effect or probability of the risk, or even accepting some or all of the potential or actual consequences of a particular risk.

Certain aspects of many of the risk management standards have come under criticism for having no measurable improvement on risk, whether the confidence in estimates and decisions seem to increase.

 

Risk mitigation planning is the process of developing options and actions to enhance opportunities and reduce threats to project objectives . Risk mitigation implementation is the process of executing risk mitigation actions. Risk mitigation progress monitoring includes tracking identified risks, identifying new risks, and evaluating risk process effectiveness throughout the project .

 

Risk Mitigation Strategies
General guidelines for applying risk mitigation handling options are shown in Figure 2. These options are based on the assessed combination of the probability of occurrence and severity of the consequence for an identified risk. These guidelines are appropriate for many, but not all, projects and programs.

Risk Mitigation Handling Options
Risk mitigation handling options include:

  • Assume/Accept: Acknowledge the existence of a particular risk, and make a deliberate decision to accept it without engaging in special efforts to control it. Approval of project or program leaders is required.
  • Avoid: Adjust program requirements or constraints to eliminate or reduce the risk. This adjustment could be accommodated by a change in funding, schedule, or technical requirements.
  • Control: Implement actions to minimize the impact or likelihood of the risk.
  • Transfer: Reassign organizational accountability, responsibility, and authority to another stakeholder willing to accept the risk.
  • Watch/Monitor: Monitor the environment for changes that affect the nature and/or the impact of the risk.

Each of these options requires developing a plan that is implemented and monitored for effectiveness. More information on handling options is discussed under best practices and lessons learned below.

From a systems engineering perspective, common methods of risk reduction or mitigation with identified program risks include the following, listed in order of increasing seriousness of the risk:

  1. Intensified technical and management reviews of the engineering process
  2. Special oversight of designated component engineering
  3. Special analysis and testing of critical design items
  4. Rapid prototyping and test feedback
  5. Consideration of relieving critical design requirements
  6. Initiation of fallback parallel developments