UDP User Datagram Protocol
 


The User Datagram Protocol (UDP) is one of the core members of the Internet protocol suite, the set of network protocols used for the Internet. With UDP, computer applications can send messages, in this case referred to as datagrams, to other hosts on an Internet Protocol (IP) network without prior communications to set up special transmission channels or data paths. The protocol was designed by David P. Reed in 1980 and formally defined in RFC 768.

UDP uses a simple transmission model with a minimum of protocol mechanism. It has no handshaking dialogues, and thus exposes any unreliability of the underlying network protocol to the user's program. As this is normally IP over unreliable media, there is no guarantee of delivery, ordering or duplicate protection. UDP provides checksums for data integrity, and port numbers for addressing different functions at the source and destination of the datagram.

UDP is suitable for purposes where error checking and correction is either not necessary or performed in the application, avoiding the overhead of such processing at the network interface level. Time-sensitive applications often use UDP because dropping packets is preferable to waiting for delayed packets, which may not be an option in a real-time system. If error correction facilities are needed at the network interface level, an application may use the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) or Stream Control Transmission Protocol (SCTP) which are designed for this purpose.

A number of UDP's attributes make it especially suited for certain applications.

  • It is transaction-oriented, suitable for simple query-response protocols such as the Domain Name System or the Network Time Protocol.
  • It provides datagrams, suitable for modeling other protocols such as in IP tunneling or Remote Procedure Call and the Network File System.
  • It is simple, suitable for bootstrapping or other purposes without a full protocol stack, such as the DHCP and Trivial File Transfer Protocol.
  • It is stateless, suitable for very large numbers of clients, such as in streaming media applications for example IPTV
  • The lack of retransmission delays makes it suitable for real-time applications such as Voice over IP, online games, and many protocols built on top of the Real Time Streaming Protocol.
  • Works well in unidirectional communication, suitable for broadcast information such as in many kinds of service discovery and shared information such as broadcast time or Routing Information Protocol

Packet structure

  • UDP is a minimal message-oriented Transport Layer protocol that is documented in IETF RFC 768.
  • UDP provides no guarantees to the upper layer protocol for message delivery and the UDP protocol layer retains no state of UDP messages once sent. For this reason, UDP is sometimes referred to as Unreliable Datagram Protocol.
  • UDP provides application multiplexing (via port numbers) and integrity verification (via checksum) of the header and payload. If transmission reliability is desired, it must be implemented in the user's application.
Offset (bits) Field
0 Source Port Number
16 Destination Port Number
32 Length
48 Checksum
64+ Data