Impairment Loss for a Cash-Generating Unit

The impairment loss should be allocated to reduce the carrying amount of the assets of the unit in the following order:

  • First, to goodwill allocated to the cash-generating unit (if any); and
  • Then, to the other assets of the unit on a pro-rata basis based on the carrying amount of each asset in the unit.

These reductions in carrying amounts should be treated as impairment losses on individual assets.

The carrying amount of an asset should not be reduced below the highest of:

  • Its net selling price (if determinable);
  • Its value in use (if determinable); and
  • Zero

The amount of the impairment loss that would otherwise have been allocated to the asset should be allocated to the other assets of the unit on a pro-rata basis.

Reversal of an Impairment Loss

An enterprise should assess at each balance sheet date whether there is any indication that an impairment loss recognised for an asset in prior accounting periods may no longer exist or may have decreased. If any such indication exists, the enterprise should estimate the recoverable amount of that asset. An impairment loss recognised for an asset in prior accounting periods should be reversed if there has been a change in the estimates of cash inflows, cash outflows or discount rates used to determine the asset’s recoverable amount since the last impairment loss was recognised. If this is the case, the carrying amount of the asset should be increased to its recoverable amount. That increase is a reversal of an impairment loss. Indications of a potential decrease in an impairment loss are mainly mirror the indications of a potential impairment loss discussed above as external and internal indicators. The concept of materiality applies in identifying whether an impairment loss recognised for an asset in prior accounting periods may need to be reversed and the recoverable amount of the asset determined.

Reversal of an Impairment Loss for an Individual Asset

If impairment loss was written off to profit and loss account, then the reversal of impairment loss should be recognized as income in the financial statement immediately. If impairment loss was adjusted with the Revaluation Reserve as per AS 10; then reversal of impairment loss will be written back to the reserve account to the extent it was adjusted, any surplus will be recognised as revenue. But in any case the increased carrying amount of an asset due to a reversal of an impairment loss should not exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined (net of amortisation or depreciation) had no impairment loss been recognised for the asset in prior accounting periods. This is mainly because any further increase in value of asset is revaluation, which is governed by AS 10.

After a reversal of an impairment loss is recognised, the depreciation (amortisation) charge for the asset should be adjusted in future periods to allocate the asset’s revised carrying amount, less its residual value (if any), on a systematic basis over its remaining useful life.

Reversal of an Impairment Loss for a Cash-Generating Unit

A reversal of an impairment loss for a cash-generating unit should be allocated to increase the carrying amount of the assets of the unit in the following order:

  • First, assets other than goodwill on a pro-rata basis based on the carrying amount of each asset in the unit; and
  • Then, to goodwill allocated to the cash-generating unit (if any),

Reversal of an Impairment Loss for Goodwill

This Statement does not permit an impairment loss to be reversed for goodwill because of a change in estimates, an impairment loss recognised for goodwill should not be reversed in a subsequent period unless:

  • The impairment loss was caused by a specific external event of an exceptional nature that is not expected to recur; and
  • Subsequent external events have occurred that reverse the effect of that event.

Impairment in case of Discontinuing Operations

In applying this Statement to a discontinuing operation, an enterprise determines whether the recoverable amount of an asset of a discontinuing operation is assessed for the individual asset or for the asset’s cash-generating unit. For example:

  • If the enterprise sells the discontinuing operation substantially in its entirety, none of the assets of the discontinuing operation generate cash inflows independently from other assets within the discontinuing operation. Therefore, recoverable amount is determined for the discontinuing operation as a whole and an impairment loss, if any, is allocated among the assets of the discontinuing operation in accordance with this Statement;
  • If the enterprise disposes of the discontinuing operation in other ways such as piecemeal sales, the recoverable amount is determined for individual assets, unless the assets are sold in groups; and
  • If the enterprise abandons the discontinuing operation, the recoverable amount is determined for individual assets as set out in this Statement.

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