Amortisation Period

The depreciable amount of an intangible asset should be allocated on a systematic basis over the best estimate of its useful life. Amortisation should commence when the asset is available for use. Estimates of the useful life of an intangible asset generally become less reliable as the length of the useful life increases. This Statement adopts a presumption that the useful life of intangible assets is unlikely to exceed ten years.

In some cases, there may be persuasive evidence that the useful life of an intangible asset will be a specific period longer than ten years. In these cases, the presumption that the useful life generally does not exceed ten years is rebutted and the enterprise:

  • Amortises the intangible asset over the best estimate of its useful life.
  • Estimates the recoverable amount of the intangible asset at least annually in order to identify any impairment loss and
  • Discloses the reasons why the presumption is rebutted and the factor(s) that played a significant role in determining the useful life of the asset.

If control over the future economic benefits from an intangible asset is achieved through legal rights that have been granted for a finite period, the useful life of the intangible asset should not exceed the period of the legal rights unless the legal rights are renewable and renewal is virtually certain. There may be both economic and legal factors influencing the useful life of an intangible asset: economic factors determine the period over which future economic benefits will be generated; legal factors may restrict the period over which the enterprise controls access to these benefits. The useful life is the shorter of the periods determined by these factors.

Amortisation Method

A variety of amortisation methods can be used to allocate the depreciable amount of an asset on a systematic basis over its useful life. These methods include the straight-line method, the diminishing balance method and the unit of production method. The method used for an asset is selected based on the expected pattern of consumption of economic benefits and is consistently applied from period to period, unless there is a change in the expected pattern of consumption of economic benefits to be derived from that asset. There will rarely, if ever, be persuasive evidence to support an amortisation method for intangible assets that results in a lower amount of accumulated amortisation than under the straight-line method.

The amortisation charge for each period should be recognised as an expense unless another Accounting Standard permits or requires it to be included in the carrying amount of another asset.

Residual Value

The residual value of an intangible asset should be assumed to be zero unless:

  • There is a commitment by a third party to purchase the asset at the end of its useful life
  • There is an active market for the asset and:
    • Residual value can be determined by reference to that market and
    • It is probable that such a market will exist at the end of the asset’s useful life.

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