Handling Employee Feuds

Handling Employee Feuds

When two of your employees are in conflict, the consequences can involve your entire staff. The case may even resound in the highest echelons of your company. On the other hand, it’s easy to distort the differences between two individuals. A mild disagreement, even a quarrel, may represent a temporary state of affairs. People, being human, don’t always like or respect one another. However, when you become aware of friction between employees there are steps…

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Dealing with the Interpersonal Problems

Dealing with the Interpersonal Problems

“Among the touchiest, most explosive problems an executive must face,” says Lee J. Smith, president of Tri-Tex Advertising, of Dallas, “are those dealing with attitudes, values, or habits of subordinates.” What’s referred to here are situations that arise on the work scene that cannot be dealt with on a simple matter-of-fact basis. For example: A valued employee tells you he’s leaving for another job. You must fire a subordinate. An employee complains to you about…

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Getting the most out of employee ideas

Getting the most out of employee ideas

Even in the absence of suggestion systems, subordinates will make suggestions or offer ideas that they think bring about desirable improvements on the work scene. When an employee offers an idea, how do you push for a payoff? Consider these moves: 1. Develop and refine. Often when an employee brings you an idea, it’s half-baked. You have to help him develop the idea to where it is usable. You and he—and others who can contribute—put…

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Learn how to say no.

Learn how to say no.

An abrupt no is usually painful to the person to whom it is addressed. What is worse, it can sever a relationship, sever communications. As a rule, a no is necessary in three types of situations: an offer of service from a subordinate a question asked for the purpose of getting information a request intended to produce a favor or benefit If a no is followed by thank you, the offer of service shows the…

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What to do, when decisions go sour?

What to do, when decisions go sour?

Executives—using one method or another—somehow manage to make decisions. But only a small percentage of decision-makers know how to proceed when a decision goes wrong. And remember, even the most carefully considered, well-planned decision can turn sour. Five positive moves may save the day: Recognizing. his move is a “must” prelude to all the others. Clear-headed, honest recognition of the fact that, on this particular decision, you have come up with a clinker. It may…

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Three types of "Motivation"

Three types of “Motivation”

Why do people do things? For example, what makes an employee get out of a comfortable bed to brave the problems and ordeals of a job? What makes an executive apply himself to a task, work over-time to complete a particularly challenging project? In general, people are moved to act by three types of motives: 1. External motivation. Many people do what they do because they’re told to do it. A parent tells a child…

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Solving Unsolvable Problems

Solving Unsolvable Problems

“Reaching for the moon” is a phrase that denotes trying to achieve the impossible. But now in our lifetime comes the achievement that gives the lie to the old phrase. Our national heroes, Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Edwin Aldrin, did the undoable by achieving the objectives of Apollo Eleven and being the first men on the moon. The feat made the whole world proud—and thoughtful. Perhaps other “undoable” tasks are within our reach. At…

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How to decide which job comes first?

How to decide which job comes first?

When you have two or more jobs to do, which comes first? Essentially, what’s involved in the establishment of a priority. Of course, when the urgency of one project is obvious, there is no problem. But frequently the sequence in which to tackle a series of projects isn’t self-evident. In such a situation, consider these four principles: Principle No. 1: Do the easier job first With the easy job out of the way, the executive…

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How To Balance A-Team?

How To Balance A-Team?

Recently, there has been a trend towards the task-force or project-team approach. This means the executive must devote some thought to the makeup of a task force he may create, so it may function effectively. Small groups lack some elements that apply to larger ones. First, smaller units, of two or three members for example, cannot be “organized” in the same sense as a large group. And the question of leadership worsens. Consider the problem…

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Improving your public speaking effectiveness

Improving your public speaking effectiveness

“The executive who talks impressively in public may not be better than his tongue-tied opposite number, but he sure makes a better impression.” That’s a common opinion in top executive circles. The average executive has many opportunities for public speaking. Every­thing from the informal company meeting to an invitation to address an industry-wide convention may come your way. If you are less effective as a public speaker than you would like to be, consider first…

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